What is AdBlue?

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What Is Adblue

Unfamiliar with AdBlue? You’re not alone. However, if you own a diesel vehicle, particularly a recent model, it’s worth noting. Want to know more? Here’s the scoop: does your car require AdBlue?

AdBlue is a type of exhaust fluid used in modern diesel vehicles to reduce emissions. It is stored in a separate tank, distinct from the primary fuel tank.

What does AdBlue do?

AdBlue plays a crucial role in reducing harmful emissions from diesel cars, particularly nitrogen oxides (NOx). When injected into the exhaust system, AdBlue reacts with NOx to convert it into harmless nitrogen and water.

By reducing NOx emissions, AdBlue enables car manufacturers to meet stringent emissions regulations and helps to improve air quality.

As a vehicle owner, using AdBlue can also provide added peace of mind that you’re doing your part to reduce your environmental impact.

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Who needs AdBlue?

AdBlue is commonly used in diesel vehicles that have been manufactured since 2015 and are equipped with Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems.

If you own a recent diesel car or a van with an SCR system, you may already be familiar with AdBlue.

It’s worth noting that AdBlue usage is not limited to passenger vehicles alone, as it is also utilized in larger diesel-powered vehicles such as buses, trucks, and agricultural machinery.

In short, if your diesel vehicle is equipped with an SCR system, it will require AdBlue to meet emissions standards.

How does AdBlue work?

AdBlue works by injecting small quantities of the fluid into the exhaust system of a diesel vehicle. The AdBlue then produces ammonia, which reacts with the nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the exhaust gas.

The NOx is converted into harmless nitrogen and water, which are released into the atmosphere. This reaction takes place in the vehicle’s Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system, which is designed to reduce harmful emissions.

The result is a significant reduction in NOx emissions, which helps diesel vehicles to meet stringent emissions standards.

How harmful are exhaust emissions?

Exhaust emissions, particularly nitrogen oxides (NOx), can have significant negative impacts on both the environment and human health.

NOx is formed during the high-temperature combustion of diesel, and when released into the air, it can lead to the formation of smog and acid rain.

More importantly, NOx can also contribute to a range of serious health problems, including respiratory issues such as asthma, bronchitis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as cardiovascular problems like heart disease and stroke.

To address these issues, regulatory authorities have established laws and emissions standards to limit the amount of NOx that vehicles can emit. AdBlue plays a vital role in helping diesel vehicles meet these regulations by reducing NOx emissions.

By using AdBlue, diesel vehicle owners can help to improve air quality and promote better health outcomes for themselves and those around them.

Learn more about how harmful exhaust emissions are from the UK Health and Safety Executive.

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Where can you get AdBlue?

AdBlue is widely available and can be purchased from a variety of sources. Many trusted vendors, including Amazon and eBay, sell AdBlue online, making it easy to purchase from the comfort of your own home. In addition, numerous specialist car websites offer AdBlue for sale, ensuring that you can find what you need quickly and easily.

If you require AdBlue urgently and don’t have time to wait for an online delivery, your local garage or petrol station may also stock AdBlue. It’s worth noting that some larger petrol stations and truck stops have AdBlue pumps available for public use, making it even more convenient for diesel vehicle owners to refill their AdBlue tanks.

Adblue

How much is AdBlue?

AdBlue is an affordable solution for reducing emissions in diesel vehicles. The cost of AdBlue varies depending on the quantity and where you purchase it from.

Typically, you can purchase 10 litres of AdBlue for around £10, but prices may vary depending on the supplier.

It’s worth noting that larger quantities of AdBlue, such as 20-litre or 205-litre drums, are often cheaper per litre than smaller quantities.

Additionally, many suppliers offer bulk discounts, making it more cost-effective for commercial vehicle operators to use AdBlue on a larger scale.

Overall, AdBlue’s cost is relatively low compared to the potential cost of not meeting emissions regulations or contributing to poor air quality. It’s essential to factor AdBlue’s cost into your vehicle’s running expenses, as the amount used will vary depending on your vehicle’s mileage and AdBlue tank size.

Do I need to refill AdBlue myself?

The frequency at which you will need to refill your AdBlue tank will depend on several factors, including the size of your tank and your driving habits. Typically, a diesel vehicle will use approximately 1-1.5 litres of AdBlue for every 600 miles travelled. For example, if your AdBlue tank holds 20 litres, you can expect to travel around 12,000 miles before needing to refill it. However, if your AdBlue tank is smaller, you may need to refill it more frequently.

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During a routine service, your mechanic should top up your AdBlue supply. However, if you frequently drive long distances, you may need to top up the AdBlue yourself between services.

Your vehicle’s user handbook should provide guidance on how to refill the AdBlue tank. It’s essential to keep an eye on your AdBlue levels to avoid running out, as this can cause your vehicle to enter a reduced power mode or even fail to start.

In some cases, your vehicle may also provide warnings when AdBlue levels are getting low, allowing you to refill the tank before the situation becomes critical. By regularly monitoring and topping up your AdBlue supply, you can ensure that your diesel vehicle remains compliant with emissions regulations and maintains optimal performance.

Where do I find the AdBlue tank?

AdBlue is stored in a separate reservoir tank from the fuel tank in diesel vehicles. In most vehicles, the AdBlue tank is located close to the fuel tank, typically in the rear of the vehicle.

However, the exact location of the AdBlue tank may vary depending on the vehicle make and model.

If you’re having trouble locating your AdBlue tank, your manufacturer’s handbook should provide detailed information on its location and how to access it.

In some vehicles, the AdBlue tank may be located in a hard-to-reach area or require special tools to access it. In these cases, it’s essential to follow the manufacturer’s instructions to avoid damaging the tank or its components.

It’s also crucial to ensure that you’re using the correct type of AdBlue and not mixing it with other fluids, as this can lead to damage to the vehicle’s emissions system.

Overall, it’s essential to locate your AdBlue tank and familiarize yourself with its location and access procedures. By doing so, you can ensure that you can refill your AdBlue tank easily and correctly, maintaining optimal vehicle performance and compliance with emissions regulations.

Can I put AdBlue in my fuel tank?

No, do not put AdBlue in your fuel tank under any circumstances. Doing so can cause significant damage to your fuel system, which can be both costly and time-consuming to repair.

AdBlue is a separate fluid that is only used in the vehicle’s emissions system to reduce harmful emissions.

If you accidentally put AdBlue in your fuel tank, do not turn on the ignition. Doing so can cause the AdBlue to mix with the diesel, leading to potential engine damage and costly repairs. Instead, seek professional help immediately to drain and flush the fuel system before refilling it with diesel.

To avoid this mistake, it’s essential to know the location of both your AdBlue tank and your fuel tank and understand the differences between the two fluids.

AdBlue is typically stored in a blue-coloured tank, while diesel is stored in a black or green-coloured tank. It’s also essential to read the manufacturer’s handbook carefully to understand the correct procedures for refilling both tanks to avoid costly mistakes.

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I already put AdBlue in my fuel tank. What should I do?

If you’ve accidentally put AdBlue in your fuel tank, it’s essential to take immediate action to avoid causing damage to your vehicle’s engine. First, do not start the engine, as doing so can cause the AdBlue to mix with the diesel fuel and lead to potential engine damage.

Instead, contact your breakdown service immediately for assistance. They will have the expertise and equipment necessary to safely drain your fuel tank and dispose of the AdBlue. Depending on your insurance cover, you may find that you’re covered for this type of mistake.

It’s important to note that the cost of repairing any potential damage to your engine resulting from the AdBlue mix-up may not be covered by your car insurance. As such, it’s crucial to take care when refilling fluids and ensure that you’re using the correct type of fluid for the intended system.

In summary, if you’ve accidentally put AdBlue in your fuel tank, seek professional assistance immediately and avoid starting your engine. By taking prompt action, you can minimise the risk of damage to your vehicle and potentially reduce the cost of repairs.

What is AdBlue made of?

AdBlue is a solution made from a blend of de-ionized water and urea, a chemical compound found in animal urine and other organic materials. Contrary to a popular myth, AdBlue is not made from pig urine or any other animal waste product. Instead, it is a synthetic liquid that is manufactured to specific industry standards.

AdBlue is a safe and sterile liquid that is non-toxic and poses no threat to the environment or human health. However, due to its chemical composition, it does have an unpleasant smell that can be compared to ammonia or urine.

It’s worth noting that proper handling and storage of AdBlue is essential to prevent contamination or degradation of the fluid, which can lead to reduced effectiveness and potential damage to the vehicle’s emissions system.

Overall, AdBlue is a carefully engineered solution that is designed to reduce harmful emissions from diesel vehicles. Its composition is well-documented and thoroughly tested to ensure that it meets strict industry standards for safety and performance.

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Will AdBlue affect my fuel consumption?

Using AdBlue should not affect your fuel consumption significantly. AdBlue is not a fuel additive; it is only used to reduce harmful emissions from the exhaust system.

The AdBlue is injected into the exhaust, where it reacts with nitrogen oxides (NOx) to convert them into harmless substances, such as water and nitrogen. This reaction does not affect fuel consumption, which is primarily determined by factors such as engine size, vehicle weight, driving style, and road conditions.

However, it’s worth noting that the AdBlue injection system itself may have a small impact on fuel consumption. The injection system requires power to operate, which can result in a slight increase in fuel consumption.

Nevertheless, this impact is minimal and should not significantly affect your vehicle’s overall fuel economy.

In summary, using AdBlue should not significantly affect your fuel consumption, but it’s worth keeping an eye on your fuel efficiency to ensure that your vehicle is performing optimally.

How long does AdBlue last?

Running out of AdBlue can cause your diesel vehicle to enter a reduced power mode or even prevent it from starting. Car manufacturers design vehicles with this safety feature to prevent drivers from exceeding legal emissions limits.

When the AdBlue tank is running low, warning messages will typically appear on the dashboard display, giving you enough time to top it up before it runs out completely. It’s essential to refill your AdBlue tank promptly to avoid any potential issues with starting your vehicle.

If you do run out of AdBlue, you will need to refill the tank before you can start your vehicle again. It’s crucial to use the correct type of AdBlue and avoid mixing it with other fluids, as this can cause damage to your vehicle’s emissions system. If you’re unable to refill the AdBlue tank yourself, seek professional assistance to ensure that the tank is refilled correctly.

In summary, it’s important to keep an eye on your AdBlue levels and refill the tank promptly to avoid running out. By doing so, you can maintain optimal vehicle performance, ensure compliance with emissions regulations, and avoid potentially costly repairs.

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What happens if I run out of AdBlue?

Running out of AdBlue can have serious consequences for your diesel vehicle. If your AdBlue tank runs dry, your vehicle may enter a reduced power mode, preventing it from starting, or even lead to complete engine failure.

Car manufacturers include this safety feature intentionally to ensure that drivers comply with emissions regulations and avoid excessive air pollution.

How do I know if I’m running out of AdBlue?

Your diesel vehicle should have a dashboard warning light that alerts you when your AdBlue levels are running low. Typically, this warning light will appear when the AdBlue tank is down to its last 1,500 miles or so.

It’s crucial not to ignore these warning messages and to top up your AdBlue tank promptly. If you allow the AdBlue levels to fall too low, you risk running out completely, which can lead to your vehicle entering a reduced power mode, preventing it from starting or even engine failure.

If you’re unsure about how to refill your AdBlue tank or have any concerns about the AdBlue system in your vehicle, consult your manufacturer’s handbook or seek advice from a professional mechanic.

By staying on top of your AdBlue levels and addressing any warning messages promptly, you can ensure that your vehicle remains compliant with emissions regulations, avoids potentially costly repairs, and maintains optimal performance.

What cars use AdBlue?

AdBlue has been used in heavy goods vehicles such as trucks, buses, and coaches for many years. In recent times, the use of AdBlue has also become common in diesel cars, particularly those manufactured after 2015.

The European Union introduced stricter emissions regulations in 2015, which prompted many car manufacturers to adopt AdBlue technology to meet the new standards. As a result, many diesel cars built after 2015 are equipped with Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems that use AdBlue to reduce harmful nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions.

It’s worth noting that not all diesel cars use AdBlue, as some manufacturers use alternative emissions reduction technologies. However, if you own a diesel car built after 2015, it’s likely that your vehicle uses AdBlue as part of its emissions reduction system. If you’re unsure whether your vehicle uses AdBlue or not, consult your manufacturer’s handbook or seek advice from a professional mechanic.

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Does my car use AdBlue?

If you own a diesel car built after 2017, it’s highly likely that your vehicle uses AdBlue. AdBlue became a mandatory requirement for new diesel vehicles in Europe in September 2015, and since then, most diesel cars have been equipped with Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems that use AdBlue to reduce harmful nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions.

To confirm whether your diesel car uses AdBlue or not, check your manufacturer’s handbook or consult a professional mechanic. The handbook should provide information about the type of emissions reduction system installed in your vehicle and whether AdBlue is required.

It’s important to note that failing to use AdBlue correctly or ignoring warning messages can lead to vehicle malfunctions or even failure to start. Therefore, it’s crucial to monitor your AdBlue levels regularly, refill the tank when necessary, and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for AdBlue use and storage.